Photo Post: Headcorn Warbirds Part 1:

Headcorn airfield has played a huge part in my life, , it is and always has been my local airfield. A small grass strip with a friendly atmosphere, with easy views of the runway even from your car, it’s the perfect place to waste away a day watching aeroplanes.

Headcorn has always attracted some unique aeroplanes, many in fact have been based there over the years, including Tiger Moths, Stampes, Buckers, Harvards, Turbulents, Cubs and even a Cosmic Wind! This is another reason that the airfield is such a wonderful place to spend a day.

But as well as being home to some wonderful vintage aircraft, Headcorn has always attracted warbirds, being a Mustang and Thunderbolt Advanced Landing Ground leading up to D-Day it is fitting that Headcorn sees as many Second World War aircraft as it does.

Leading in to the weekend, I thought I’d share a few photos of some of Headcorn’s historic visitors over the years, in part two I will focus a little more on some of the specific visitors:

Rob Davies low down the runway in "Big Beautiful Doll." For many years a Headcorn regular.

Rob Davies low down the runway in “Big Beautiful Doll.” For many years a Headcorn regular.

The "Biggles Biplane" BE2 replica from Sywell at Headcorn earlier this year.

The “Biggles Biplane” BE2 replica from Sywell at Headcorn earlier this year.

Mustangs have always been a reccuring theme at Headcorn. Here is Maurice Hammond's "Janie". With "Big Beautiful Doll" behind.

Mustangs have always been a reccuring theme at Headcorn. Here is Maurice Hammond’s “Janie”. With “Big Beautiful Doll” behind.

It isn't just the "Big Iron" turning heads at Headcorn: FW44 Steiglitz.

It isn’t just the “Big Iron” turning heads at Headcorn: FW44 Steiglitz.

Peter Teichman has been known to drop in with his aircraft over the years, here is his P-40 at headcorn some years ago.

Peter Teichman has been known to drop in with his aircraft over the years, here is his P-40 at headcorn some years ago.

Peter Teichman's MK.XI Spitfire trying to blend in to its surroundings.

Peter Teichman’s MK.XI Spitfire trying to blend in to its surroundings.

That concludes this first, visual look at Headcorn’s interesting visitors over the years. The next post will tell more of the story from the past few years.

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